Ireland’s Genealogy & Local History Specialists

Tag Archives: search Irish ancestry


We Found The Grandparents .. For A Grandmother

 

For one happy customer we found her parents and grandparents – who she had never known – at the age of 77! We are telling about it in the video below.

Fiona, her daughter, told us: “Mum is pouring over all the details…. I can see many conversations in the future, wonderful to find out your grandparents names at the age of 77! Thank you.”

Do you want us to find your ancestors for you? Have a read of our service or request a quote.

 

Michael van Turnhout of Genealogy.ie published in North American Genealogy Magazine

 

“Your Genealogy Today” is a leading North American genealogy magazine. It is a “how-to” publication, giving tips, tools and advise to family historians about researching their ancestry. It is published by Moorshead Magazines Ltd. . This company also publishes “Internet Genealogy” and “History Magazine”.  Although based in Toronto, Canada, 90% of the circulation is in the USA.

The magazines can be obtained via subscription or via Barnes & Noble and Books-A-Million  in the USA or Chapters book stores in Canada. Alternatively, they can be ordered or downloaded in PDF format from their online store.

The reason why we post about it, is that the September/October issue contains an article from our own Michael van Turnhout. The title of his article is “Snapshot of an Irish School”. It talks about what we can learn about the lives of our ancestors by looking at a typical school in the mid-nineteenth century. If you are interested to learn about your ancestors’ local school, why don’t you Contact Us

Overview of articles in the September/October issue of “Your Genealogy Today“.

The Name of a Rose: Connecting With the Past 
Sue Lisk finds that you can make amazing connections with your ancestors through hints they leave for future generations

Crimes Across Multiple Jurisdictions
Diane L. Richard follows a North Carolina family through court records

Discover Your WWI Ancestor Through State-Based Resources
Margaret Moen looks at State-based records you might encounter when searching for your WWI ancestor

Road Overseers, Surveyors of Highways, and Road Juries
David A. Norris looks at how early road-building records might pave the way to new genealogical information

Eyewitness to History: My Ancestor Was There!
Robbie Gorr discovers an ancestor who lived in Tombstone, Arizona during some of the most tumultuous times in Western US history

Using Apprentice Records for Genealogy Searches
Ed Storey explores apprenticeship program records and what they might reveal about ancestors who worked in the trades

Your Irish Ancestors and Their Schools
Michael van Turnhout looks at a snapshot of a 19th century school

Interview with Mary Tedesco
Leslie Michele Derrough sits down with the genealogy researcher and co-host of Genealogy Roadshow to learn about her passion for genealogy

Genealogy & the Law
Where there is – or isn’t – a will. Judy G. Russell explains what you might find in a probate

The Back Page
Dave Obee says: “Sometimes, it’s hard to see the obvious”

 

 

Gravedigger Stories from Deansgrange Cemetery

This blog contains a large photo gallery of Deansgrange Cemetery. Please give it a moment to load!

 

Deansgrange Cemetery is located in the local council area of Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown, a suburb of Dublin. It is open to the public. The cemetery is, together with Glasnevin, one of the largest in the Dublin area, occupying 65 acres. (So if you want to visit a particular grave, you should find out first where it is!). First burial was Anastasia Carey, 41 years, Servant St. Joseph’s Orphanage, 27th January 1865.

Hover over the pictures below to see the title; click on them to see a larger picture and its story.

 

 

Disclaimer: Most of the stories in this gallery are from gravedigger “John”, who told them to us during a “Dun Loaghaire Heritage Tour” of the Deansgrange Cemetery.  They come from relatives who visited the graves and some have been told from colleague to colleague and even generation to generation and might therefore not be accurate. They are certainly very entertaining. Thanks for the stories, John.

 

We hope you enjoyed these photos and their stories. Why not have a look at the rest of our website?

 

jillian van turnhout nee hassett

Jillian van Turnhout – Founder Genealogy.ie – An Introduction

 

JILLIAN VAN TURNHOUT NÉE HASSETT is a respected children’s and human rights expert. She is also a former Senator in the upper house of the Irish Parliament. Furthermore, she is a founder of Genealogy.ie

See her introduction on YouTube:

Throughout Jillian van Turnhout’s career, in both the private and public sector, her achievements have been recognised. This includes winning the Social Entrepreneur of the Year Award and Politician of the Year Award. In addition, the President of France recognised  her work recently by awardeding her the Chevalier de l’Ordre National du Mérite. This is the second highest national Order of France.

GENEALOGY

Parallel to this work, Jillian has been developing her skills as a genealogist. She has researched her own and clients’ family history throughout Ireland, the UK, USA and Canada. Jillian is passionate about family history and understands the richness and fulfilment that goes with finding out about your ancestors and their lives. She joins with other genealogists campaigning for the publication of the 1926 Census of Ireland.

Despite the current laws in Ireland presenting a number of roadblocks, Jillian van Turnhout has broken through barriers and assisted former adoptees in tracing their roots. During her time in the Irish Senate, Jillian championed the right of adoptees to have their right to identity firmly established in law.

Through her extensive voluntary and professional career, Jillian has developed an extensive network of contacts throughout Ireland. In 2010, Jillian received the ‘Freedom of Killarney’, County Kerry.

Jillian van Turnhout has attended many genealogy conferences and seminars in Ireland, the UK and USA. This includes Roots Tech in Salt Lake City, the largest family history event in the world.

In the words of Roots author Alex Haley “In all of us there is a hunger, marrow-deep, to know our heritage – to know who we are and where we have come from.” Jillian has therefore decided to dedicate herself full time to bringing the richness of your Irish family history to life for you.

Have this hunger too? Why not have a look at the rest of our website?

 

Jillian van Turnhout awarded Chevalier de l’Ordre National du Mérite

 

The founder of Genealogy.ie, Jillian van Turnhout, was awarded the prestigious Chevalier de l’Ordre National du Mérite by the President of the French Republic. The Chevalier de l’Ordre National du Mérite is the second highest national order of France and was presented to Jillian van Turnhout by the Ambassador of France to Ireland at an event hosted in the French Residence in Dublin

The award was made in recognition of Jillian van Turnhout’s work in strengthening children’s rights and for her engagement with civil society organisations across Europe.

On receipt of the Chevalier de l’Ordre National du Mérite, Jillian van Turnhout said “I am immensely honoured to be recognised by the President of the French Republic for my work in promoting children’s rights and for my engagement with civil society organisations across Europe. Recent world events have strengthened my resolve and belief in the European Union project and to advocate for a Europe that is stronger together. This award and the French national motto of ‘liberty, equality, fraternity’ remind me of our shared values. We must work together in solidarity to uphold and ensure the rights of all citizens to live without fear in a world that respects freedom, democracy and equality.”

At the event in the French Residence, the Ambassador of France to Ireland, H.E. Jean-Pierre Thébault, remarked that “with the bestowal of the Ordre National du Mérite to Ms Jillian van Turnhout, France wishes to acknowledge a friend’s lifetime commitment and the part she played on numerous subjects that require flag bearers: from issues related to children’s rights to the promotion of the European ideal. Jillian’s public and professional paths are also testament to the important role women play in public life to make change happen and shape a better and more inclusive society.”

Maurice Pratt, Chairman of European Movement Ireland, commenting on the distinguished honour, said “There are few people more deserving of this award than Jillian. Having worked closely with Jillian, I have seen her tireless dedication to the causes she champions, including Irish-European affairs and children’s rights. It is a pleasure to see her being recognised for her outstanding contribution to developing Irish-European relations, and Irish-French relations in particular. I offer her my sincere congratulations on this well-deserved honour.”

The Chief Commissioner of the Irish Girl Guides, Helen Concannon, who also attended the event, said: “We are delighted to congratulate Jillian on the acknowledgement by another country of her tireless work for young people. She epitomises what the Baden Powells, the founders of Guiding and Scouting, meant when they said, ‘Girls should be brought up to be comrades and helpers, not to be dolls. They should take a real and not a visionary share in the welfare of the nation.’ “We are proud of all Jillian has achieved and all she continues to achieve through her involvement with Girl Guides,”

 

Biography Jillian van Turnhout
In addition to her work with Genealogy.ie, Jillian van Turnhout is a leading children’s rights advocate and a former Irish Senator. In her 5 year term in Seanad Éireann (upper house Irish Parliament), Jillian spearheaded a number of legislative and policy changes to further children’s rights. Jillian is involved with several not-for-profit organisations on a pro bono basis including as Vice Chair of European Movement Ireland, Chair of Early Childhood Ireland and Chair of Children in Hospital Ireland. She is a former Chief Executive of the Children’s Rights Alliance, former Chief Commissioner Irish Girl Guides and former President of the National Youth Council of Ireland.

For over 12 years Jillian was a member and Vice President of the EU Advisory Body, the European Economic and Social Committee. Jillian drafted the first Opinion from an EU body on the need for a European Youth Policy and published a number of papers to further children’s rights. Jillian represented the EESC on the Steering Group for the European Forum on the Rights of the Child and the EESC EU-China Round for over 6 years leading to first formal dialogue on children’s rights between China and EU in 2010 in Chongqing, China. Jillian is a co-founder of the European Youth Forum.

Below are some photos taken at the event. Click on it for a larger image.

We hope you enjoyed this gallery. Why not have a look at the rest of our website?

Marley House: A Visit

 

Genealogy.ie believes that your family story is not just about names and dates of people in your family tree. We think it is also about the places where they lived and worked, the houses they lived in. This is why, when we search Irish ancestry for our clients,  we  also offer Irish local history research and investigation. In most cases our research is into the history of a house or farm. But it can also be a village or even an event. Depending on records available this gives you a picture of how your ancestors would have lived. And thus add colour to your Irish family history.

Take Marley House. Up to quite recently it was a large demesne (mansion house which was also a working farm, albeit a large one). Watch our short presentation:

MARLEY HOUSE

Marley as a land holding traces its origins back to the Anglo-Norman times. The Fleming family were the first owners, followed by by the Cistercian religious order. Religious orders were the biggest landowners at the time. King Henry VIII abolished them and resold the lands he took. The new owner was called Taylor.

He build the older farmhouse, a large part of it still in existence (courtyard). It was then bought by a series of families who used the property as their ‘out of town’ refuge. Living in the growing city of Dublin was unhealthy. Therefore rich families bought farms and lands and constructed mansion houses in the immediate environs of the city. The area around Marley was very popular as it was at the foot of the Dublin and Wicklow mountains. This not only had fresher air but also offered stunning views. The first of these families built Marley House.

This was actually the name of the wife of the owner, a bishop’s daughter. His own name was LaTouche. His family were Huguenots who had fled France. They started as weavers but became a wealthy banking family. After a few different families had owned the property, the last of them, the Tedcastle family, sold it to the local council who has turned the gardens into a great public park and is in the process of restoring the house. This spring free tours are available to see the inside of the ground floor of the house.

We hope you enjoyed the video and story. Why not have a look at the rest of our website?

 

How we found a missing photo

 

We were commissioned to find an old photo of “J.F. Hudson”, former Captain (1932) of the Royal Dublin Golf Club. They had tried without success and were left with a blank space in the Club Photo gallery of Past Captains. www.Genealogy.ie rose to the challenge as our short video below will explain and his photo is now proudly on the wall.

John Fenton Hudson, 1870 to 1947

We hope you enjoyed the video. Why not have a look at the rest of our website?

 

Why hire Genealogy.ie?

 

Are you considering getting help with tracing your Irish family history? It pays to get a professional specialist to search Irish ancestry for you.

With over 10 years of experience in Irish family history search and local history research, Jillian and Michael are specialists in the field.

Jillian and Michael have left no stone unturned in search of family members and stories. They have traveled throughout Ireland to find sources that can only be viewed locally. They have met with family members, as well as with local people and historians. And they have trawled through archives. In short, they have been more than willing to go the extra mile to find out a minute detail or secure a missing photo.

If you are just starting your Irish family history search, they can show you the way with an initial investigation. And point out avenues for further research and give advice on how best to proceed. Alternatively they can do the search Irish ancestry for you.

If you already have a family tree but just cannot find that elusive Irish ancestor, they can help filling in that gap.

If you have hit a brick wall, or do not know what to do next, they can help you move forward.

They can also verify your family history research for you, to ensure you have found the right people.

They can travel to places where your ancestors lived or are buried. You will receive a detailed description, complete with photo’s.

They can also enrich your family tree with local history research. This can be the history of an area where your ancestors lived, a village, or even the history of a house of farm, if available.

Finally, they can help you put your family history in a great looking presentation. This can be a slide show, video or booklet. Great for that next family gathering or as a personal gift.

Click on the image below to have a look at our services.

 

Our visit to Patrick Pearse School – Pearse Museum

 

Edward Hudson, a State Dentist, built ‘The Hermitage’ in 1786. Over a century later, Patrick Pearse discovered the house while on a historical pilgrimage of sites associated with Robert Emmet. Set in nearly fifty acres of beautiful parkland, Pearse moved his innovative school into it in 1910. His family gave it later to the Irish state, who turned it into a museum, telling the story of Patrick Pearse. The Office of Public Works operates and manages Pearse Museum and St Enda’s Park.

Have a look at our video giving an impression of the museum. Below the video is some information on the life of Patrick Pearse.

PATRICK PEARSE

Patrick Pearse was born at 27 Great Brunswick Street in Dublin, the street that is named after him today. His father, James Pearse, established a stonemasonry business here in the 1850’s. The business provided the Pearses with a comfortable middle-class life.

In 1900, Pearse received a B.A. in Modern Languages (Irish, English and French). He immediately enrolled in the King’s Inns and was called to the bar in 1901.

Before then, in 1896, only 16 years old, he had joined the Gaelic League. Subsequently, in 1903 Pearse became editor of its newspaper. He wanted to help save the Irish language. To do this, he wanted to establish a sympathetic education system. Therefore, to set an example, Pearse started his own bilingual school, Saint Enda (Scoil Éanna). Teaching was in both English and Irish. In 1908 it opened in Cullenswood House in Ranalagh. Two years later Saint Enda’s School moved to The Hermitage, now home to the Pearse Museum.

Patrick Pearse involved himself in Irish politics. He joined the Irish Volunteers and the Irish Republican Brotherhood. He gave a graveside oration on 1 August 1915 at the funeral of the Fenian Jeremiah O’Donovan Rossa. This oration made Patrick Pearse famous.

Pearse, on behalf of the IRB, gave the signal for the uprising in 1916.

As a result, Pearse and fourteen other leaders, including his brother Willie, were court-martialled.  A firing squad executed Patrick Pearse on the morning of 3 May 1916.

During his short live, Patrick Pearse was also a prolific writer.

We hope you enjoyed our video and story. Why not have a look at the rest of our website?

 

michael van turnhout

Introduction: Michael van Turnhout, Local History Researcher

 

Michael van Turnhout, from Genealogy.ie, believes that tracing Irish family history should not just be about names and dates of people in your family tree. We think it is also about the places where they lived and worked, the houses they lived in.  This is why we offer Irish local history research and investigation. In most cases our research is into the history of a house or farm. But it can also be a village or even an event. Depending on records available this gives you a picture of how your ancestors would have lived. And thus add colour to your family history.

Michael van Turnhout is a published Irish local history researcher. See his introductory video below:

Michael has completed work on houses, villages and even schools. In one case he was able to go back to 1279. In another research project he illustrated the change of a rural village into a suburban one due to the coming of railways. This – then – modern means of transport brought in speculators and developers, who bought and sold land. And brought in the builders of the house that was the research subject. All of this happened in the 1850’s. Times have not changed that much!

COMMISSION MICHAEL VAN TURNHOUT FOR YOUR IRISH LOCAL HISTORY RESEARCH PROJECT

If you are interested in investigating this side of your family story, Michael is happy to discuss any potential research subjects with you. We will then carry out a free preliminary check to see if there are sufficient sources available to do research on and give you a cost proposal. The findings will be presented to you in an attractive booklet with photographs, maps and copies of relevant records; it is not just a house history with a list of dates and events.

We can also create a presentation in a slideshow or PowerPoint format so you can show your family and friends.

 

Ancestral Houseor Village History