Irish Family History Specialists

Category: Genealogy.ie

Genealogy.ie Published in Your Genealogy Today Magazine

 

Genealogy.ie has just been published for the second time in “Your Genealogy Today“, a leading genealogical magazine in North America.
 

 
“Your Genealogy Today” is a resource guide to successful genealogical research. Whether you are a beginner, or an experienced genealogist, each issue provides you with proven techniques and sources for discovering your ancestors. With regular columns on: “Genealogy Tourism”, “DNA & Your Genealogy”, and “Advice from the Pros”. In each case, the columns will be authored on a rotational basis by contributors who are experts in their respective fields. It is published six times a year.

It can be bought in Barnes & Noble and Books-A-Million in the USA and Chapters book stores in Canada.

Our article in the January/February issue is about “Avoiding Common Mistakes”. It gives advice on how to prevent research errors by using the guidelines of the Genealogical Proof Standard, that we in Genealogy.ie rigorously adhere to.

This article joins a growing collection of contributions that Genealogy.ie is making to various magazines in North America and Ireland. You can read about the periodicals and download our articles from our website, by clicking the button below. (Note: our latest article is not available for download yet as it is only just published).
 

Our Contributions to Genealogical Magazines

 

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HAPPY HOLIDAYS + a little Christmas treat

 

We would like to wish you a very Happy Christmas and hope you will find lots more long lost family members in 2018.

 
TRIP DOWN MEMORY LANE

Family stories can be found in many places. Ever looked in that box in the attic with old films? Super8 films can now be converted to digital format, as we did with this short video, which was taken by a relation when she visited Bath in 1965. Included in this video is the front of 58 Hungerford Road, 3 Wellington Place and 19 Camden Place (all homes of ancestors). By 1966, 3 Wellington Place no longer existed as it had fallen away. Of course, in the film you will also see the Assembly Rooms, Bath Cathedral and life at that time.

PRAISE FROM DOWN UNDER

Finally, we just completed work for Michael, all the way from Queensland in Australia. We were very chuffed with his feedback, which we are quite happy to share with you.
 


“Your work is perfect Jillian, thanks very much. I’m so pleased I commissioned you to research my family, it saved me countless hours of fruitless searching. Your final report is so detailed, professionally presented and easy to read. I really wasn’t expecting so much, information. Well done and again thank you, it was well worth it.”

 

Genealogy Christmas Gift Voucher

 

Do you have a family member or friend who is “bitten”
by the family history “bug”?

Then they would really appreciate a voucher that will entitle them to get some professional help with their research.
 
Click on the picture below to go to our order page.

 

If you think this is a good Christmas present, please share on your Twitter and/or Facebook account:

Genealogy.ie Published in Local History Journal

 

The aim of the Kilmacud Stillorgan Local History Society is to promote and sustain an interest in our culture, heritage and history, particularly with regard to Kilmacud Stillorgan and the adjoining areas.

The twelfth edition of the Society’s annual journal, Obelisk, was launched to a packed audience in the Function Room, Glenalbyn, Stillorgan on 23 November. It’s stories help to give us a fuller picture of daily life and the streetscape of times past.

A full list of stories can be find below. For the third year running, our own Michael van Turnhout contributed to the journal with an article about a big house and its occupants over time.

 

Read Our Article

 

To obtain a copy please send €10 (Overseas €13), to cover purchase price (€6), postage and packing to: Kilmacud Stillorgan Local History Society, 9 Marsham Court, Stillorgan, Co. Dublin

List of Articles in 2018 Obelisk

Mater Admirabilis Day Secondary School in the 1960s – ROSE MARY LOGUE
Francis Ledwidge: A Name in Sunshine – FRANK TRACY
Famine Heroes of Stillorgan – BRYAN MacMAHON
Herbert Hill, Dundrum – MARGARET SMITH
Field Marshal Viscount Gough (1779-1869) – VIVIEN IGOE
I Remember Victoria Cross, Cork – PHILIP CHAMBERS
Stillorgan to Adelaide and Back – MICHAEL FITZGERALD
A Building Life – MATT CAHILL
Blackrock 75 Years Ago – BRIAN Mac AONGUSA
All Hallows College and Stillorgan – PETER SOBOLEWSKI
I was Born on a Farm in Dublin 4 – SYLVESTER BYRNE
Valley of Thrushes – SILVIA DUNNE
Growing Up in Mount Merrion in the 1940s and 1950s – RORY WALSH
Gordonville, Dundrum – MICHAEL van TURNHOUT
A Renaissance Man on Newtownpark Avenue – AIDEN FEERICK
Margaret (1813-1882) – PAT SHERIDAN
The Rural District Council and the Unclimbable Fences – JAMES SCANNELL
Excursion to Ardagh and Strokestown – AIDEN FEERICK
Genealogy Day in Glenalbyn – EDDIE GAHAN
GAA President’s Award for John Sheridan – AISLINN HARKIN
Recent Publications by our Members
Tim Finn and the Easter Rising: A Sequel – BRYAN MacMAHON
 

Genealogy.ie in the Media
Now in “Internet Genealogy” Magazine

 

Genealogy.ie is a regular contributor to genealogical and local history magazines.

For the last few years we have been writing for local history magazine “Obelisk”. The next installment of this annual publication will be launched in November, the third year running with an article by us.

In addition we also have recently been published in North-American magazine “Your Genealogy Today”, with an article about Irish schools in the nineteenth century. And although we cannot yet reveal what the article is about, we will be in the next edition of this magazine as well!

At this very moment we are being published in “Internet Genealogy“, also aimed at the North American market. This article is about a very ‘niche’ database: ‘Legacies of British Slave-ownership’. The stories in it are fascinating though. The magazine is hitting the shelves just about now! Clicking on the picture below will bring you to their website.

 

Read Our Article

 

 

Michael van Turnhout of Genealogy.ie published in North American Genealogy Magazine

 

“Your Genealogy Today” is a leading North American genealogy magazine. It is a “how-to” publication, giving tips, tools and advise to family historians about researching their ancestry. It is published by Moorshead Magazines Ltd. . This company also publishes “Internet Genealogy” and “History Magazine”.  Although based in Toronto, Canada, 90% of the circulation is in the USA.

The magazines can be obtained via subscription or via Barnes & Noble and Books-A-Million  in the USA or Chapters book stores in Canada. Alternatively, they can be ordered or downloaded in PDF format from their online store.

The reason why we post about it, is that the September/October issue contains an article from our own Michael van Turnhout. The title of his article is “Snapshot of an Irish School”. It talks about what we can learn about the lives of our ancestors by looking at a typical school in the mid-nineteenth century. If you are interested to learn about your ancestors’ local school, why don’t you Contact Us

Overview of articles in the September/October issue of “Your Genealogy Today“.

The Name of a Rose: Connecting With the Past 
Sue Lisk finds that you can make amazing connections with your ancestors through hints they leave for future generations

Crimes Across Multiple Jurisdictions
Diane L. Richard follows a North Carolina family through court records

Discover Your WWI Ancestor Through State-Based Resources
Margaret Moen looks at State-based records you might encounter when searching for your WWI ancestor

Road Overseers, Surveyors of Highways, and Road Juries
David A. Norris looks at how early road-building records might pave the way to new genealogical information

Eyewitness to History: My Ancestor Was There!
Robbie Gorr discovers an ancestor who lived in Tombstone, Arizona during some of the most tumultuous times in Western US history

Using Apprentice Records for Genealogy Searches
Ed Storey explores apprenticeship program records and what they might reveal about ancestors who worked in the trades

Your Irish Ancestors and Their Schools
Michael van Turnhout looks at a snapshot of a 19th century school

Interview with Mary Tedesco
Leslie Michele Derrough sits down with the genealogy researcher and co-host of Genealogy Roadshow to learn about her passion for genealogy

Genealogy & the Law
Where there is – or isn’t – a will. Judy G. Russell explains what you might find in a probate

The Back Page
Dave Obee says: “Sometimes, it’s hard to see the obvious”

 

 

jillian van turnhout nee hassett

Jillian van Turnhout – Founder Genealogy.ie – An Introduction

JILLIAN VAN TURNHOUT NÉE HASSETT is a respected children’s and human rights expert. She is also a former Senator in the upper house of the Irish Parliament. Furthermore, she is a founder of Genealogy.ie
 
See her introduction on YouTube:

 
Throughout Jillian van Turnhout’s career, in both the private and public sector, her achievements have been recognised. This includes winning the Social Entrepreneur of the Year Award and Politician of the Year Award. In addition, the President of France recognised her work recently by awarding her the Chevalier de l’Ordre National du Mérite. This is the second-highest national Order of France.

GENEALOGY

Parallel to this work, Jillian has been developing her skills as a genealogist. She has researched her own and clients’ family history throughout Ireland, the UK, USA and Canada. Jillian is passionate about family history and understands the richness and fulfilment that goes with finding out about your ancestors and their lives. She joins with other genealogists campaigning for the publication of the 1926 Census of Ireland.
 
Despite the current laws in Ireland presenting a number of roadblocks, Jillian van Turnhout has broken through barriers and assisted former adoptees in tracing their roots. During her time in the Irish Senate, Jillian championed the right of adoptees to have their right to identity firmly established in law.
 
Through her extensive voluntary and professional career, Jillian has developed an extensive network of contacts throughout Ireland. In 2010, Jillian received the ‘Freedom of Killarney’, County Kerry.
 
Jillian van Turnhout has attended many genealogy conferences and seminars in Ireland, the UK and USA. This includes Roots Tech in Salt Lake City, the largest family history event in the world.
 
In the words of Roots author Alex Haley “In all of us there is a hunger, marrow-deep, to know our heritage – to know who we are and where we have come from.” Jillian has therefore decided to dedicate herself full time to bringing the richness of your Irish family history to life for you.
 
Have this hunger too? Why not have a look at the rest of our website?

Jillian van Turnhout awarded Chevalier de l’Ordre National du Mérite

 

The founder of Genealogy.ie, Jillian van Turnhout, was awarded the prestigious Chevalier de l’Ordre National du Mérite by the President of the French Republic. The Chevalier de l’Ordre National du Mérite is the second highest national order of France and was presented to Jillian van Turnhout by the Ambassador of France to Ireland at an event hosted in the French Residence in Dublin

The award was made in recognition of Jillian van Turnhout’s work in strengthening children’s rights and for her engagement with civil society organisations across Europe.

On receipt of the Chevalier de l’Ordre National du Mérite, Jillian van Turnhout said “I am immensely honoured to be recognised by the President of the French Republic for my work in promoting children’s rights and for my engagement with civil society organisations across Europe. Recent world events have strengthened my resolve and belief in the European Union project and to advocate for a Europe that is stronger together. This award and the French national motto of ‘liberty, equality, fraternity’ remind me of our shared values. We must work together in solidarity to uphold and ensure the rights of all citizens to live without fear in a world that respects freedom, democracy and equality.”

At the event in the French Residence, the Ambassador of France to Ireland, H.E. Jean-Pierre Thébault, remarked that “with the bestowal of the Ordre National du Mérite to Ms Jillian van Turnhout, France wishes to acknowledge a friend’s lifetime commitment and the part she played on numerous subjects that require flag bearers: from issues related to children’s rights to the promotion of the European ideal. Jillian’s public and professional paths are also testament to the important role women play in public life to make change happen and shape a better and more inclusive society.”

Maurice Pratt, Chairman of European Movement Ireland, commenting on the distinguished honour, said “There are few people more deserving of this award than Jillian. Having worked closely with Jillian, I have seen her tireless dedication to the causes she champions, including Irish-European affairs and children’s rights. It is a pleasure to see her being recognised for her outstanding contribution to developing Irish-European relations, and Irish-French relations in particular. I offer her my sincere congratulations on this well-deserved honour.”

The Chief Commissioner of the Irish Girl Guides, Helen Concannon, who also attended the event, said: “We are delighted to congratulate Jillian on the acknowledgement by another country of her tireless work for young people. She epitomises what the Baden Powells, the founders of Guiding and Scouting, meant when they said, ‘Girls should be brought up to be comrades and helpers, not to be dolls. They should take a real and not a visionary share in the welfare of the nation.’ “We are proud of all Jillian has achieved and all she continues to achieve through her involvement with Girl Guides,”

 

Biography Jillian van Turnhout
In addition to her work with Genealogy.ie, Jillian van Turnhout is a leading children’s rights advocate and a former Irish Senator. In her 5 year term in Seanad Éireann (upper house Irish Parliament), Jillian spearheaded a number of legislative and policy changes to further children’s rights. Jillian is involved with several not-for-profit organisations on a pro bono basis including as Vice Chair of European Movement Ireland, Chair of Early Childhood Ireland and Chair of Children in Hospital Ireland. She is a former Chief Executive of the Children’s Rights Alliance, former Chief Commissioner Irish Girl Guides and former President of the National Youth Council of Ireland.

For over 12 years Jillian was a member and Vice President of the EU Advisory Body, the European Economic and Social Committee. Jillian drafted the first Opinion from an EU body on the need for a European Youth Policy and published a number of papers to further children’s rights. Jillian represented the EESC on the Steering Group for the European Forum on the Rights of the Child and the EESC EU-China Round for over 6 years leading to first formal dialogue on children’s rights between China and EU in 2010 in Chongqing, China. Jillian is a co-founder of the European Youth Forum.

Below are some photos taken at the event. Click on it for a larger image.

We hope you enjoyed this gallery. Why not have a look at the rest of our website?

Why hire Genealogy.ie?

 

Are you considering getting help with tracing your Irish family history? It pays to get a professional specialist to search Irish ancestry for you.

With over 10 years of experience in Irish family history search and local history research, Jillian and Michael are specialists in the field.

Jillian and Michael have left no stone unturned in search of family members and stories. They have traveled throughout Ireland to find sources that can only be viewed locally. They have met with family members, as well as with local people and historians. And they have trawled through archives. In short, they have been more than willing to go the extra mile to find out a minute detail or secure a missing photo.

If you are just starting your Irish family history search, they can show you the way with an initial investigation. And point out avenues for further research and give advice on how best to proceed. Alternatively they can do the search Irish ancestry for you.

If you already have a family tree but just cannot find that elusive Irish ancestor, they can help filling in that gap.

If you have hit a brick wall, or do not know what to do next, they can help you move forward.

They can also verify your family history research for you, to ensure you have found the right people.

They can travel to places where your ancestors lived or are buried. You will receive a detailed description, complete with photo’s.

They can also enrich your family tree with local history research. This can be the history of an area where your ancestors lived, a village, or even the history of a house of farm, if available.

Finally, they can help you put your family history in a great looking presentation. This can be a slide show, video or booklet. Great for that next family gathering or as a personal gift.

Click on the image below to have a look at our services.

 

Our Campaign to release the 1926 Census

 

 

I join with other genealogists and family historians in calling on the Irish Government to release the 1926 Census. The current restriction on public access to the census returns taken since independence in 1922, commonly known as the 100-year rule, was introduced as part of the Statistics Act 1993. However, during the legislative debate, the then Minister of State Noel Dempsey TD gave a commitment to the Seanad to reduce the lock to 70 years. While the 2011 Programme for Government made a commitment to release the records, every effort to date to change the law and allow for the release of records has been blocked.

The 1926 Census would be a powerful genealogical tourism tool. For family historians it would be wonderful to track each part of our family line between the 1911 census and 1926 census during this period of Irish history.

I use my own history as a case in point. My dad, Michael Hassett, was born in 1936 in Dingle, Co. Kerry. His mother, Mary Catherine Foley was born in 1905 in Cromane, Co. Kerry and his father, John Francis Hassett was born in 1904 in Glin, Co. Limerick but grew up in Knockanean, near Ennis, Co. Clare. They married in Dublin in 1930 and my dad was the fifth of six children. His mother died in Beaumont, Ballintemple, Cork, in their then family home, in December 1944 and his father died within three short months in February 1945 after an accident on his bike. My dad had lost both parents by the tender age of eight.

Dad was fortunate that his Aunty Helen moved to their family home in Cork to look after him and his five siblings including his older brothers Tom, and Sean and baby brother Liam who would still like to know more about their parents’ history. My dad died in November 2015 and I am still on the trail of his parents and their ancestors through available records and newspaper cuttings. I know the 1926 Census would provide rich data and add to our knowledge and yet these records are ‘sealed’ until January 2027.

I can access the 1940 US Census, the 1939 Register of England and Wales, the 1920 Canadian Census but alas not the 1926 Census of Ireland.  The 1950 US Census will be released in 2022 – five years before Ireland releases the 1926 Census. The information in the 1926 Census has been sealed in the interests of confidentiality. However, it is highly likely that every adult recorded in that Census is now dead. Furthermore, the information recorded simply comprises of forename, surname, age, marital status, relationship to head of household, religion, occupation and townland where born, employer, and if unemployed normal profession – and so I wonder why the need for secrecy.  Why can’t the 1926 Census be released?  My dad’s three brothers are currently aged between 73 and 81 years. The 1926 Census has the potentially to fill in important gaps in their family history, such as where their mother and father were in the years before they married in 1930.  It is absurd that we have to wait until 2027 to access this information?  The story of my family history is just one of countless who hunger for information on their identity and roots not to mention the benefits to tourism a release of this nature will attract.

In July 2016 I wrote an Open Letter to Government calling for release of 1926 Census of Ireland.

For background reading here are extracts I have put together of the original Oireachtas Debate on Statistics Bill 1993

I have received the following responses:
Letter from Chief Whip Regina Doherty, July 2016
Letter from Minister for Arts Heritage, Regional, Rual and Gaeltacht Affairs, 19 August 2016
Letter to Minister Shane Ross from Dept of Arts Heritage and the Gaeltacht, 19 August 2016

You can watch my YouTube video on this topic by clicking on the link (opens in a new window).

We hope you agree with our point of view. Why not have a look at the rest of our website?

 
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